About Michael A. Tompkins, PhD, ABPP

Michael A. Tompkins, PhD, ABPP is a licensed psychologist (PSY13822) and board certified in Behavioral and Cognitive Psychology, co-director of the San Francisco Bay Area Center for Cognitive Therapy, Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, Diplomate and Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, and is a trainer and consultant for the Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior. He is the author or co-author of numerous scholarly articles and chapters on cognitive-behavior therapy and related topics, as well as seven books. Dr. Tompkins treats adults, adolescents, and children with anxiety disorders (panic, worry, phobias, social anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, health anxiety), stress, insomnia, body-focused repetitive behaviors (trichotillomania, skin picking, nail biting), elimination disorders (enuresis and encopresis), and Tourette’s and tic disorders.   For an appointment, call 510.652.4455 ext. 3 To learn more about Dr. Tompkins, visit his profile here.
17 10, 2018

Five Tips to Help Teens Build a Sleep Wind-Down Routine

By | October 17th, 2018|Sleep Sense, Teen Topics|

The teenage brain is in high gear all day and when they're ready to sleep, teens can’t just turn them off. Here are five tips to help them wind-down.

9 10, 2018

Role of Play in Cognitive-Behavior Therapy

By | October 9th, 2018|Kid Korner|

Engaging children in therapy is important to successful treatment, and play is a great way to do that. Here are just a few of the benefits of play therapy.

27 03, 2018

Tips for Finding the Right Therapist for Your Anxious Teen

By | March 27th, 2018|Teen Topics|

Finding the right therapist is an important first step in helping the teen who is suffering with anxiety and stress. Here are questions to ask before choosing a therapist.

8 03, 2018

Six Tips for Parenting an Anxious Teen

By | March 8th, 2018|Teen Topics|

Caring for an anxious teen is challenging and stressful, so here are six tips to make it easier and take care of yourself.

8 03, 2018

Six Tips to Help Your Teen Procrastinate Less

By | March 8th, 2018|Teen Topics|

Every teen puts off a task, but some are big-time procrastinators. If your teen is one of them, here are six things you can do to help.

16 02, 2018

Six Tips for Assigning Therapy Homework with Teens

By | February 16th, 2018|Partner Perspectives, Teen Topics|

"The Relaxation and Stress Reduction Workbook for Teens: CBT Skills to Help You Deal with Worry and Anxiety" includes many activities that will help your teen clients feel more relaxed and worry free.

6 01, 2018

Recognizing Ambivalence When Treating Hoarding Disorder

By | January 6th, 2018|From OCD to Anxiety, Partner Perspectives|

Ambivalence – and a great deal of it – is a typical feature of hoarding disorder. Even clients who seek treatment for this debilitating condition bring considerable ambivalence to the goals and tasks of the treatment.

16 12, 2017

Does My Loved One Have Hoarding Disorder (HD)?

By | December 16th, 2017|From OCD to Anxiety, Partner Perspectives|

The visible signs that a loved one has Hoarding Disorder (HD) can, in some cases, be pretty obvious. Here are ten warning signs that your loved one may have HD.

1 12, 2017

Cognitive-Behavior Therapy and Harm Reduction for Hoarding Disorder

By | December 1st, 2017|From OCD to Anxiety, Partner Perspectives|

Hoarding disorder (HD) is a complex condition that affects approximately two to five percent of the population and is a difficult problem to treat. However, researchers have developed a special form of cognitive-behavior therapy that is promising for the treatment of the condition. For those who don't seek treatment, communities have undertaken harm reduction approaches.

1 09, 2017

Responding to Ambivalence in People Who Hoard

By | September 1st, 2017|Partner Perspectives|

Ambivalence – and a great deal of it – is a typical feature of hoarding disorder. Given the considerable ambivalence of most clients with this condition, clinicians want to take care to avoid inadvertently shutting down the client’s motivation to work on the problem. Here are typical ways clinicians shut down motivation when treating hoarding disorder.